Therapy

Sex Therapy

Sex therapy is similar to seeing a therapist/psychologist for general mental health issues, but a sex therapist has more knowledge and comfort discussing sex with clients than many therapists who practice as generalists. Sex therapy can be highly beneficial as it provides a unique space to openly discuss important issues such as sex and sexuality without fear of judgment.

Our Services

CSWC offers individual, couples/marital, and family psychotherapy services to address a wide range of sex, sexuality and gender-related concerns. Some presenting concerns we address include but are not limited to:

  • Connector.

    Male sexual dysfunction

    This includes erectile dysfunction, sexual pain, premature ejaculation.

  • Connector.

    Female sexual dysfunction

    This includes low desire, difficulty with arousal and orgasm, sexual pain.

  • Connector.

    Desire discrepancy in relationships

    When one partner is more interested in sex and intimacy than the other.

  • Connector.

    Impulsive or compulsive sexual behavior

    Commonly referred to as “sex addiction”

  • Connector.

    Sexual orientation

    Sexual identity development and understanding attraction patterns.

  • Connector.

    Gender authenticity

    Exploring and understanding authentic gender identity and expression.

  • Connector.

    Uncomfortable sexual interests or fantasies

    Exploration without judgment or shame.

  • Connector.

    Infidelity

    A safe space to work through the strong emotions and help decide the right course for the relationship.

  • Connector.

    Developing a healthy sexuality

    Improving understanding of real sexuality in the lives of real people.

  • Connector.

    Changing sexuality over the Lifespan

    Our bodies change over the course of our lifetime, and we can help you adapt to the changes.

A Typical Session

Typical therapy sessions last 45-60 minutes, and are spent discussing the client’s concerns in the context of their life. As in all therapeutic relationships, boundaries are important and there will be no physical contact between therapists and clients. Weekly therapy is usually recommended initially while the client and therapist are building a working relationship, and this frequency may or may not change over time. Therapy is discontinued when the client has made sufficient progress on their treatment goals. While sex is often part of the work in sex therapy, one’s sex life exists in the context of the rest of their life. Therefore it is not uncommon to discuss things that are seemingly unrelated to the presenting concerns, but are usually relevant upon further exploration.

Pricing and Insurance

At CSWC our goal is to provide quality services to all members of the community. We are in network with Blue Cross and Blue Shield PPO and Indemnity insurance plans and would be happy to file your in-network claims for you if we are a covered provider under your plan. We are also a non-network/non-participating provider for Tricare. We are out of network with all other insurance companies at this time. Clients who have insurance other than BCBS or Tricare may use their out-of-network benefits for services provided at CSWC. If a client chooses to use their out of network benefits, they will pay the full session fee at each session. We will then submit a claim on your behalf to your insurance company who will reimburse you the company’s allowable amount after processing the claim. It is the client’s responsibility to know their out-of-network reimbursement rate.

For clients who are uninsured, we offer a sliding scale to help make the cost of therapy more affordable to those who may not otherwise have access to quality sex therapy services. The cost of 60-minute therapy sessions ranges from $30-$175. Please contact us about this option for more information.

CSWC does not engage in “reparative” or “conversion” therapy, the basis of which erroneously assumes certain sexual identities and interests to be mental disorders which can be changed or “cured.” Many health organizations have taken the position that there is no compelling evidence that these therapies are effective and that they are actually harmful to patients. These organizations include but are not limited to the American Medical Association, the American Psychiatric Association, the American Psychological Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American Association of Sex Educators, Counselors and Therapists